We Humans Take Ourselves Far Too Seriously

You know, sometimes I get so tired of all the stuff we seem to fight about.

Well, I get tired of it; and sometimes, I also want to laugh hysterically at how ridiculous it all is. Religion, race, gender, diet, sexuality, and whatnot. I mean, really? It’s bad enough that the only way humans seem to feel superior and good about themselves is if they put someone else down. But, can you picture our known, proved, actual reality for just a minute? We are all — all 7 billion+ of us — living on a small rock that is spinning, minding its own business, in the middle of a vast abyss with other rocks.

 

https://www.theverge.com/tldr/2017/5/11/15623628/history-of-the-entire-world-i-guess-bill-wurtz-watch-this
Image Credit: https://www.theverge.com/tldr/2017/5/11/15623628/history-of-the-entire-world-i-guess-bill-wurtz-watch-this

 

All it would really take is for the Earth to hiccup, and we’d all be gone. Earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, etc. (Did I miss any? Well, anyway, you get the idea.) All it would take is a worldwide string of one or more of these. And that’s it. Capisce. The human race as we know it would be gone. Sure, some of us may survive. Or not. And it wouldn’t matter. Know why? ‘Cause the Earth is a rock that has been spinning in the middle of an abyss for centuries, and it’s going to continue spinning whether we’re here or not.

I mean, seriously, saving the planet? Are you kidding? Please. We’re saving ourselves. We’re just trying the make sure the rock we’re living on doesn’t crack or sink or erupt and get rid of us. ‘Cause, despite it all, we’re survivors, and deep at our core, we like living. And we’d like it very much if the planet continued housing us, thank you.

So really, we’re all just teeny weeny specks on another bigger speck in the universe. And we seem to think that all these labels, all these categories, all these dominance games (’cause, in essence, I think that’s what they are), all these fights and there-is-only-one-right-way attitude, will actually make a difference. It’s kind of hilarious that we seem to think we have any right at all to decide what is right for everyone else when we are all, ourselves, at the mercy of a silent, spinning rock.

Don’t get me wrong. That doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t hope and dream and strive for our goals and ambitions. Rather, the fact that anything can happen at any time and that we’re all just here, together, muddling along as best as we can, just makes these dreams and ambitions that much more important and worthwhile. But, do our dreams and ambitions have to be focussed on deciding how others live, what they want, and how they should be? Do they have to be focused on deciding who should be ostracized and limited and who should be accepted?

I mean, are we that bored?

Frankly speaking, I think that as long as someone’s decisions and actions don’t directly harm another or their freedom, then it should just be let it go. Let them go their way, and let us go ours, and you can go your way. It might not always be comfortable. It might not always feel right. But so what? We’re living on a small spinning rock in space. (And no, I cannot reiterate this enough.)

We have limited lives and, despite how advanced technology is today and how many “facts” we know, the truth is that we’re still discovering the world and everything about it. And, it’s kind of miraculous to be alive at all, don’t you think? All of us on a spinning blue ball in the middle of an abyss? With a multitude of other living species?

So are we really going to waste so much time telling other people how to live, how to be, and what to do? Are we really going to continue fighting about such things till the end of time?

Again: Are we humans really that bored?

 

You know, sometimes I get so tired of all the stuff we seem to fight about. Well, I get tired of it; and sometimes, I also want to laugh hysterically at how ridiculous it all is. Religion, race, gender, diet, sexuality, and whatnot. I mean, really? It's bad enough that the only way humans seem to feel superior and good about themselves is if they put someone else down. But, can you picture our known, proved, actual reality for just a minute? We are all -- all 7 billion+ of us -- living on a small rock that is spinning, minding its own business, in the middle of a vast abyss with other rocks. All it would really take is for the Earth to hiccup, and we'd all be gone. Earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, etc. (Did I miss any? Well, anyways, you get the idea.) All it would take is a worldwide string of one or more of these. And that's it. Capisce. The human race as we know it would be gone. Sure, some of us may survive. Or not. And it wouldn't matter. Know why? 'Cause the Earth is a rock that has been spinning in the middle of an abyss for centuries, and it's going to continue spinning whether we're here or not. I mean, seriously, saving the planet? Are you kidding? Please. We're saving ourselves. We're just trying the make sure the rock we're living on doesn't crack or sink or erupt and get rid of us. 'Cause, despite it all, we're survivors, and, deep at our core, we like living. And we'd like it very much if the planet continued housing us, thank you. So really, we're all just teeny weeny specks on another bigger speck in the universe. And we seem to think that all these labels, all these categories, all these dominance games ('cause, in essence, I think that's what they are), all these fights and there-is-only-one-right-way attitude, will actually make a difference. It's kind of hilarious that we seem to think we have any right at all to decide what is right for everyone else when we are all, ourselves, at the mercy of a silent, spinning rock. Don't get me wrong. That doesn't mean that we shouldn't hope and dream and strive for our goals and ambitions. Rather, the fact that anything can happen at any time and that we're all just here, together, muddling along as best as we can, just makes these dreams and ambitions that much more important and worthwhile. But, do your dreams and ambitions Have to be focussed on deciding how others live, what they want, and how they should be? Do they Have to be focussed on deciding who should be ostracized and limited and who should be accepted? I mean, are you that bored? Frankly speaking, I think that as long as someone's decisions and actions don't directly harm another or their freedom, then it should just be let it go. Let them go their way, and let us go ours, and you go your way. It might not always be comfortable. It might not always feel right. But so what? We're living on a small spinning rock in space. (And no, I cannot reiterate this enough.) We have limited lives and, despite how advanced technology is today and how many "facts" we know, the truth is we're still discovering the world and everything about it. And, it's kind of miraculous to be alive at all, don't you think? All of us on a spinning blue ball in the middle of an abyss? With a multitude of other living species? So are we really going to waste so much time telling other people how to live, how to be, and what to do? Are we really going to continue fighting about such things till the end of time? Again: Are you really that bored? By Written By A Moody Pen. WOLIWAIS

#Consent

"You know you want this, love," she purred, "I'll show you a good time." Trapped against the wall, tipsy, trembling, terrified, he forced himself to smile at her. Flash Fiction. Written By A Moody Pen. Raven Pegasus.

 

“You know you want this, love,” she purred, “I’ll show you a good time.”

Trapped against the wall, tipsy, trembling, terrified, he forced himself to smile at her.

 

How Our Education System Actually Encourages Short Attention Spans

Author’s Note: I’m going to mainly focus on student experiences in India for this. But I think at least some of these examples might apply to the rest of the world too. If not, you have my apologies (and my envy.)


 

It starts at school.

As they get to higher and higher grades, here’s how students are instructed to write exams: “Write a lot. If it’s 5 marks, write more than a page; maybe more than two. By-heart the headings; don’t write your own. And, if possible, by-heart the textbook too.”

 

Blog Post: It starts at school. As they get to higher and higher grades, here's how students are instructed to write exams: "Write a lot. If it's 5 marks, write more than a page; maybe more than two. Byheart the headings; don't write your own. And, if possible, by-heart the textbook too." Basically, students are told to cram facts into their heads in as short a time as possible, and writing sheafs worth of papers in as short a time as possible. In fact (at least, it was true when I was a student) I don't think a single student escaped the experience of -- at least once -- having his or her answer sheet snatched away from them while they were still in mid-write at the end of an exam. Well. Then came college. Here, students aren't limited to textbooks. Instead, they get reference books -- which may only cover half the topics they really need to learn. For the rest, they must scour the college library or the Internet for notes. Plus, they still needed to write as much as possible during exams, regardless of whether the questions only facilitate short answers or not. So again -- like a video game that has the same steps but gets more intense when you reach a higher level -- in college, students have to cram in at least 3 times more information than they ever did in high school; and in a much shorter time too (6 months per semester). As a consequence, to accommodate this new need, students pick up skills like speed-reading and skimming content at top speeds. They figure out that watching a video will let them cover more ground than reading a book. They learn to browse a number of books at once and a number of online sources at once. They learn to pile their daily schedules and just run. Finally, they just get used to doing things fast; to fill in their time all the time, and to produce and do and learn a lot in increasingly short amounts of time. (A lot of the time, they also get used to quantity over quality too.) And then, when they finally graduate . . . those habits stay. The fact that technology and video games are a normal part of everyday life for them has contributed a little, yes. But honestly, with this kind of study-lifestyle, a student's capacity for "patience" and "focus" was already dying anyway. And it's not fair to blame their short attention spans on technology or impatience -- (granted, there are those kinds too, but they're not the only kinds) -- when they were only encouraged to be so with their work when they were still students. Written By A Moody Pen. WOLIWAIS.
Credit: http://thedailycougar.com/2012/09/06/college-students-are-burnt-out/

 

Basically, students are told to cram facts into their heads in as short a time as possible, and to write sheafs worth of papers in as short a time as possible.

 

It starts at school. As they get to higher and higher grades, here's how students are instructed to write exams: "Write a lot. If it's 5 marks, write more than a page; maybe more than two. Byheart the headings; don't write your own. And, if possible, by-heart the textbook too." Basically, students are told to cram facts into their heads in as short a time as possible, and writing sheafs worth of papers in as short a time as possible. In fact (at least, it was true when I was a student) I don't think a single student escaped the experience of -- at least once -- having his or her answer sheet snatched away from them while they were still in mid-write at the end of an exam. Well. Then came college. Here, students aren't limited to textbooks. Instead, they get reference books -- which may only cover half the topics they really need to learn. For the rest, they must scour the college library or the Internet for notes. Plus, they still needed to write as much as possible during exams, regardless of whether the questions only facilitate short answers or not. So again -- like a video game that has the same steps but gets more intense when you reach a higher level -- in college, students have to cram in at least 3 times more information than they ever did in high school; and in a much shorter time too (6 months per semester). As a consequence, to accommodate this new need, students pick up skills like speed-reading and skimming content at top speeds. They figure out that watching a video will let them cover more ground than reading a book. They learn to browse a number of books at once and a number of online sources at once. They learn to pile their daily schedules and just run. Finally, they just get used to doing things fast; to fill in their time all the time, and to produce and do and learn a lot in increasingly short amounts of time. (A lot of the time, they also get used to quantity over quality too.) And then, when they finally graduate . . . those habits stay. The fact that technology and video games are a normal part of everyday life for them has contributed a little, yes. But honestly, with this kind of study-lifestyle, a student's capacity for "patience" and "focus" was already dying anyway. And it's not fair to blame their short attention spans on technology or impatience -- (granted, there are those kinds too, but they're not the only kinds) -- when they were only encouraged to be so with their work when they were still students. Written By A Moody Pen. WOLIWAIS.
Credit: https://www.emaze.com/@ALCQILLR/Stress-In-Our-Life

 

In fact (at least, it was true when I was a student) I don’t think a single student escaped the experience of — at least once — having his or her answer sheet snatched away from them while they were still in mid-write at the end of an exam.

Well. Then came college.

Here, students aren’t limited to textbooks. Instead, they get reference books — which may only cover half the topics they really need to learn (if they’re lucky, that is). For the rest, they must scour the college library or the Internet for notes.

 

Then came college. Here, students aren't limited to textbooks. Instead, they get reference books -- which may only cover half the topics they really need to learn. For the rest, they must scour the college library or the Internet for notes. Plus, they still needed to write as much as possible during exams, regardless of whether the questions only facilitate short answers or not. So again -- like a video game that has the same steps but gets more intense when you reach a higher level -- in college, students have to cram in at least 3 times more information than they ever did in high school; and in a much shorter time too (6 months per semester). As a consequence, to accommodate this new need, students pick up skills like speed-reading and skimming content at top speeds. They figure out that watching a video will let them cover more ground than reading a book. They learn to browse a number of books at once and a number of online sources at once. They learn to pile their daily schedules and just run. Finally, they just get used to doing things fast; to fill in their time all the time, and to produce and do and learn a lot in increasingly short amounts of time. Written By A Moody Pen. WOLIWAIS.
Credit: https://www.cartoonstock.com

 

Plus, they still need to write as much as possible during exams, regardless of whether the questions only facilitate short answers or not.

So again — like a video game that has the same steps but gets more intense when you reach a higher level — in college, students have to cram in at least 3 times more information than they ever did in high school; and in a much shorter time too (there are only 6 months in a semester).

As a consequence, to accommodate this new need, students pick up skills like speed-reading and skimming content at top speeds. They figure out that watching a video will let them cover more ground than reading a book. They learn to browse a number of books at once and a number of online sources at once. They learn to pile their daily schedules and just run.

Then came college. Here, students aren't limited to textbooks. Instead, they get reference books -- which may only cover half the topics they really need to learn. For the rest, they must scour the college library or the Internet for notes. Plus, they still needed to write as much as possible during exams, regardless of whether the questions only facilitate short answers or not. So again -- like a video game that has the same steps but gets more intense when you reach a higher level -- in college, students have to cram in at least 3 times more information than they ever did in high school; and in a much shorter time too (6 months per semester). As a consequence, to accommodate this new need, students pick up skills like speed-reading and skimming content at top speeds. They figure out that watching a video will let them cover more ground than reading a book. They learn to browse a number of books at once and a number of online sources at once. They learn to pile their daily schedules and just run. Finally, they just get used to doing things fast; to fill in their time all the time, and to produce and do and learn a lot in increasingly short amounts of time. Written By A Moody Pen. WOLIWAIS.
Credit: allnurses.com

 

Finally, they just get used to doing things fast; to fill in their time all the time, and to produce and do and learn a lot in increasingly short amounts of time.

(A lot of the time, they also get used to quantity over quality too.)

And then, when they finally graduate . . . those habits stay.

The fact that technology and video games are a normal part of everyday life for them has contributed a little, yes. But honestly, with this kind of study-lifestyle, a student’s capacity for “patience” and “focus” was already dying anyway. And it’s not fair to blame their short attention spans on technology or impatience — (granted, there are those kinds of students/graduates too, but they’re not the only kinds) — when they were only encouraged to be so with their work when they were still students.

.

(Oh, and a comment from a friend made me realize I should mention this:

I wasn’t a poor student in my student-days, and this is not a rant to justify how warped the education system is simply because I couldn’t cut it.

I was actually a very good student who scored pretty well, maintained a rank, and always submitted assignments on time. And I’m a teacher myself now too.

It’s rather because I’m a teacher now, remember what it was like to be a student like that, and still see students being affected this way — and then later being blamed for their short attention spans and lack of focus — that I wanted to write this.

Because success at being a student doesn’t take away from the fact that this kind of study-lifestyle actually messes with your ability to concentrate on one thing for a long time and forces you to get used to constantly shifting your focus. ‘Cause if a student doesn’t adapt this way, it shows in their scores.)

Blog Post: It starts at school. As they get to higher and higher grades, here's how students are instructed to write exams: "Write a lot. If it's 5 marks, write more than a page; maybe more than two. Byheart the headings; don't write your own. And, if possible, by-heart the textbook too." Basically, students are told to cram facts into their heads in as short a time as possible, and writing sheafs worth of papers in as short a time as possible. In fact (at least, it was true when I was a student) I don't think a single student escaped the experience of -- at least once -- having his or her answer sheet snatched away from them while they were still in mid-write at the end of an exam. Well. Then came college. Here, students aren't limited to textbooks. Instead, they get reference books -- which may only cover half the topics they really need to learn. For the rest, they must scour the college library or the Internet for notes. Plus, they still needed to write as much as possible during exams, regardless of whether the questions only facilitate short answers or not. So again -- like a video game that has the same steps but gets more intense when you reach a higher level -- in college, students have to cram in at least 3 times more information than they ever did in high school; and in a much shorter time too (6 months per semester). As a consequence, to accommodate this new need, students pick up skills like speed-reading and skimming content at top speeds. They figure out that watching a video will let them cover more ground than reading a book. They learn to browse a number of books at once and a number of online sources at once. They learn to pile their daily schedules and just run. Finally, they just get used to doing things fast; to fill in their time all the time, and to produce and do and learn a lot in increasingly short amounts of time. (A lot of the time, they also get used to quantity over quality too.) And then, when they finally graduate . . . those habits stay. The fact that technology and video games are a normal part of everyday life for them has contributed a little, yes. But honestly, with this kind of study-lifestyle, a student's capacity for "patience" and "focus" was already dying anyway. And it's not fair to blame their short attention spans on technology or impatience -- (granted, there are those kinds too, but they're not the only kinds) -- when they were only encouraged to be so with their work when they were still students. Written By A Moody Pen.
Credit: https://in.pinterest.com/pin/399553798165731026/

Writing out loud, in whispers, and in silence…WOLIWAIS…

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