Tag Archives: Written by a Moody Pen

#Sensibilities

Flash Fiction by Written By A Moody Pen @WOLIWAIS. “Are you ever sensible?” “Well. I’d like to think that I’m never that boring. But I might slip up sometimes.”

 

“Are you ever sensible?”

“Well. I’d like to think that I’m never that boring. But I might slip up sometimes.”

 

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Winter Woods – Book Review / Korean Webtoon Review

[Author’s Note: This is both a spoiler in some ways and yet not at all a spoiler. Because I myself am only a few chapters in. So, if anything, I consider any information I’ve revealed about the story a mere glimpse into what it might really be about.]


Winter Woods Manhwa Review by Written By A Moody Pen. @WOLIWAIS. One of the stories I’m currently reading is Winter Woods, a manhwa I came across by accident rather than by any reference. At the moment, the story’s progressing pretty slowly. And I’ve not even gotten half-way through it. But it’s damn interesting. (My penchant for tales with a deep psychological bent helps too.) So. Here’s what I got so far: It’s about an immortal “Frankenstein’s Monster” type character, who is alive in every scientific sense except one — He has no heartbeat. Emotionally and psychologically, though, one could almost say he isn’t alive at all. For, he reacts to external stimuli, but he has no idea what emotions are. He feels pain, but it looks as though he is just startled by it, even when subjected to it in extremes. In a sense, he is like a child who has no moral compass whatsoever, or any social context. There’s no bias, no preconceived notions, no visible sense of right or wrong; there’s just curiosity. And it just makes the whole story so wonderfully nuanced! There’s also plenty here to hint at past abuse and neglect, both from the being’s creator as well as from the scientists who found him and experimented on him for a while. In fact, this entire thing starts as a way for one of these current scientists/researchers to test out whether or not he could be brought “truly” alive — that is, both physically and emotionally alive. And the only one who isn’t aware of the scheme is the one they’ve deemed fit to be exposed to him and get him “alive”. (And, this person’s a writer, by the way. One who took him in because it looked like he had an interesting story she could get at. She is also the one who named him “Winter Woods”, as he told her that he had no name when they first met.) Aside from that, there’s a serial killer in their midst whose trend might be mercy killings and suicide requests — but that’s not been fully confirmed yet. There is also a kind, blind woman who is in love with that serial killer but doesn’t find out about his “job” until later chapters. And there are other characters, backstories, and ominous foreshadowings sprinkled liberally throughout the story as well. Hence, at the moment, with so much going on in the story already, I’m really enjoying it. 
Source Credit: http://mangapark.me/manga/winter-woods

 

One of the stories I’m currently reading is Winter Woods, a manhwa I came across by accident rather than by any reference.

At the moment, the story’s progressing pretty slowly. And I’ve not even gotten half-way through it. But it’s damn interesting. (My penchant for tales with a deep psychological bent helps too.)

So. Here’s what I got so far:

It’s about an immortal “Frankenstein’s Monster” type character, who is alive in every scientific sense except one — He has no heartbeat. Emotionally and psychologically, though, one could almost say he isn’t alive at all. For, he reacts to external stimuli, but he has no idea what emotions are. He feels pain, but it looks as though he is just startled by it, even when subjected to it in extremes.

In a sense, he is like a child who has no moral compass whatsoever, or any social context. There’s no bias, no preconceived notions, no visible sense of right or wrong; there’s just curiosity. And it just makes the whole story so wonderfully nuanced!

There’s also plenty here to hint at past abuse and neglect, both from the being’s creator as well as from the scientists who found him and experimented on him for a while. In fact, this entire thing starts as a way for one of these current scientists/researchers to test out whether or not he could be brought “truly” alive — that is, both physically and emotionally alive. And the only one who isn’t aware of the scheme is the one they’ve deemed fit to be exposed to him and get him “alive”. (And, this person’s a writer, by the way. One who took him in because it looked like he had an interesting story she could get at. She is also the one who named him “Winter Woods”, as he told her that he had no name when they first met.)

 

Winter Woods Manhwa Review by Written By A Moody Pen @WOLIWAIS. One of the stories I’m currently reading is Winter Woods, a manhwa I came across by accident rather than by any reference. At the moment, the story’s progressing pretty slowly. And I’ve not even gotten half-way through it. But it’s damn interesting. (My penchant for tales with a deep psychological bent helps too.) So. Here’s what I got so far: It’s about an immortal “Frankenstein’s Monster” type character, who is alive in every scientific sense except one — He has no heartbeat. Emotionally and psychologically, though, one could almost say he isn’t alive at all. For, he reacts to external stimuli, but he has no idea what emotions are. He feels pain, but it looks as though he is just startled by it, even when subjected to it in extremes. In a sense, he is like a child who has no moral compass whatsoever, or any social context. There’s no bias, no preconceived notions, no visible sense of right or wrong; there’s just curiosity. And it just makes the whole story so wonderfully nuanced! There’s also plenty here to hint at past abuse and neglect, both from the being’s creator as well as from the scientists who found him and experimented on him for a while. In fact, this entire thing starts as a way for one of these current scientists/researchers to test out whether or not he could be brought “truly” alive — that is, both physically and emotionally alive. And the only one who isn’t aware of the scheme is the one they’ve deemed fit to be exposed to him and get him “alive”. (And, this person’s a writer, by the way. One who took him in because it looked like he had an interesting story she could get at. She is also the one who named him “Winter Woods”, as he told her that he had no name when they first met.) Aside from that, there’s a serial killer in their midst whose trend might be mercy killings and suicide requests — but that’s not been fully confirmed yet. There is also a kind, blind woman who is in love with that serial killer but doesn’t find out about his “job” until later chapters. And there are other characters, backstories, and ominous foreshadowings sprinkled liberally throughout the story as well. Hence, at the moment, with so much going on in the story already, I’m really enjoying it. 
Source Credit: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/536069161874959675/

 

Aside from that, there’s a serial killer in their midst whose trend might be mercy killings and suicide requests — but that’s not been fully confirmed yet. There is also a kind, blind woman who is in love with that serial killer but doesn’t find out about his “job” until later chapters. And there are other characters, backstories, and ominous foreshadowings sprinkled liberally throughout the story as well.

Hence, at the moment, with so much going on in the story already, I’m really enjoying it. 🙂

 


This post was first published here on Written By A Moody Pen Channel Surfing.
For posts exclusively on books, movies, and TV shows, Written By A Moody Pen’s Channel Surfing blog is where you need to go. 😉

How Patience is a Quiet Kind of Power

Patience is Power.  If you act like something is normal long enough -- like you actually believe it's perfectly fine and possible and all right -- then, no matter how unconventional or how not-normal it is, sooner or later, without realizing it, people will actually start acting like it's normal too; or at least, that it's perfectly normal and conventional for you, and thus a familiar thing.  That's why patience and consistency is a special kind of power. It's not something you write ballads about. Or history books. And it's many times upgraded to sound like something more exciting and difficult like "determination" and "perseverance" and "fighting against impossible odds".  It's not something you write ballads about. Or history books. And it's many times upgraded to sound like something more exciting and difficult like "determination" and "perseverance" and "fighting against impossible odds".  Don't get me wrong, though, it isn't easy. And these upgraded terms aren't off the mark. But they add a certain "loudness" to what is oftentimes a quiet battle that has no war-cries, weapons, or glory. Just a quiet, subtle, unremarkable victory that only the one waging the silent war knows they've won. And many times, even the one who started this silent war doesn't notice the victory. Because there was no outright fight, just a quiet decision, and an even quieter follow-through.  It's a really quiet kind of power. And greatly underestimated. WOLIWAIS. Written By A Moody Pen.
Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/debbieohi/499442937

 

If you act like something is normal long enough — like you actually believe it’s perfectly fine and possible and all right — then, no matter how unconventional or how not-normal it is, sooner or later, without realizing it, people will actually start acting like it’s normal too; or at least, that it’s perfectly normal and conventional for you, and thus a familiar thing.

That’s why patience and consistency is a special kind of power. It’s not something you write ballads about. Or history books. And it’s many times upgraded to sound like something more exciting and difficult like “determination” and “perseverance” and “fighting against impossible odds”.

It’s not something you write ballads about. Or history books. And it’s many times upgraded to sound like something more exciting and difficult like “determination” and “perseverance” and “fighting against impossible odds”.

Don’t get me wrong, though, it isn’t easy. And these upgraded terms aren’t off the mark. But they add a certain “loudness” to what is oftentimes a quiet battle that has no war-cries, weapons, or glory. Just a quiet, subtle, unremarkable victory that only the one waging the silent war knows they’ve won. And many times, even the one who started this silent war doesn’t notice the victory. Because there was no outright fight, just a quiet decision, and an even quieter follow-through.

It’s a really quiet kind of power. And greatly underestimated.

 

Patience is Power. If you act like something is normal long enough -- like you actually believe it's perfectly fine and possible and all right -- then, no matter how unconventional or how not-normal it is, sooner or later, without realizing it, people will actually start acting like it's normal too; or at least, that it's perfectly normal and conventional for you, and thus a familiar thing. That's why patience and consistency is a special kind of power. It's not something you write ballads about. Or history books. And it's many times upgraded to sound like something more exciting and difficult like "determination" and "perseverance" and "fighting against impossible odds". It's not something you write ballads about. Or history books. And it's many times upgraded to sound like something more exciting and difficult like "determination" and "perseverance" and "fighting against impossible odds". Don't get me wrong, though, it isn't easy. And these upgraded terms aren't off the mark. But they add a certain "loudness" to what is oftentimes a quiet battle that has no war-cries, weapons, or glory. Just a quiet, subtle, unremarkable victory that only the one waging the silent war knows they've won. And many times, even the one who started this silent war doesn't notice the victory. Because there was no outright fight, just a quiet decision, and an even quieter follow-through. It's a really quiet kind of power. And greatly underestimated. WOLIWAIS. Written By A Moody Pen.
Source: http://fergusonvalues.com/2013/03/the-value-of-patience-in-leadership/

 

Anantya Tantrist: Cult of Chaos – Book Review

The Gist of It: A cool, well-researched read with a bad-ass protagonist and other characters you’ll be glad to see again in a sequel.

Anantya Tantrist - Book Cover - Anantya Tantrist by Shweta Taneja. A cool, well-researched read with a bad-ass protagonist and other characters you’ll be glad to see again in a sequel. Written By A Moody Pen. WOLIWAIS. Cult of Chaos Book Review.

Now, truthfully, I don’t enjoy gory descriptions. Or horror. And I was particularly happy I finished reading well before midnight, as my own imagination can make the tamest of horror stories and moments into heart-attack inducing visions of fright at night.

But this book was marvelously researched and I loved Anantya and the other characters introduced in this book. And I was pretty upset when one of them (Spoiler Alert!) died, and brutally too — And that was after he had a pretty minor amount of page-time devoted to him, so I was surprised myself by how much his death hurt. 😦

But, there are certainly plenty of other characters in the book (who survived) that I would enjoy seeing in a sequel.

In short, if you’re someone who’d like a story with ancient Indian magic and supernatural beings in a wonderfully contemporary setting, a pretty gory mystery, and a pretty bad-ass and resourceful protagonist, then you’ll probably enjoy this book. 🙂

 

 

 


This book review was first published here on Written By A Moody Pen Channel Surfing.

#Memory

I can't imagine my life without you, and I find that I don't want to either. Darling, will you please marry me? Oh, sweetheart, we've been married for 27 years. Written By A Moody Pen. Flash Fiction

 

I can’t imagine my life without you, and I find that I don’t want to either. Darling, will you please marry me?

Oh, sweetheart, we’ve been married for 27 years.